Internet resources for English law

At the very bottom of the homepage of this blog, there are links on English law, including Delia Venables‘ site.

Note also the Internet Newsletter for Lawyers, edited by Nick Holmes and Delia Venables. (I’m not sure I realized this had a website). Both Delia Venables and Nick Holmes can be followed on Twitter, and Delia yesterday tweeted links to two articles by her:
Free case law resources online
Free current awareness legal resources
For example, there is Current Awareness from the Inner Temple Library, and Halsbury’s Law Exchange:

Halsbury’s Law Exchange is a legal think tank, hosted by LexisNexis. It aims to communicate ideas on reform or legal direction to decision makers and the legal sector and promote debate through papers, reports, events and media pieces.

Current awareness is obviously a thing.

An article by David Allan Green (who blogs as Jack of Kent) in the Solicitors Journal on The revival of legal blogging, in which he points out how many barristers blog, and how few solicitors.

A new resource to me is Lawbore, a resource site for law students created and maintained by Emily Allbon, who is a lecturer at the City Law School, City University, London. She writes about it in Lawbore: legal education made fun. One item on Lawbore is a guide to reading a law report: Anatomy of a Law Report:

Paul Magrath talks us through Hunter v Canary Wharf Ltd [1997] AC 655 providing us with pointers throughout. We also have a copy of the case in full, with no audio.

There’s also a guide to blogging lawyers.

2 thoughts on “Internet resources for English law

  1. Thanks for that Margaret. Indeed, the Inner Temple Library is an Internet trailblazer: talking of which your article has now cleared up for me (after 20 years) a long-standing Magrath vs. McGrath misconception.

    Once a fan of the legendary Irish international footballer, Paul McGrath, I thought that his (congenial) namesake I used to sit opposite at the Inner Temple dining hall, Paul McGrath QC, was one and the same as the ICLR reporter of Paul Magrath.

    I now see that the latter is someone else and had been called to the Bar at the nearby Middle Temple: no doubt causing a common confusion elsewhere of names and locations.

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