Swiss criminal law terminology / Terminologie des Schweizer Strafrechts

This vocabulary doesn’t seem familiar to me. Go to the Obergericht, click on Dolmetscherwesen and then on Strafrechtsterminologie der Bundeskanzlei (D, F, I, E). It can’t be copied, but here’s one entry, scanned, to give an impression (scanned, OCR’d but not spellchecked for the various languages):

20
Täter (1); Täterin (2); Straftäter (3); Straftäterin (4); Delinquent (5); Delinquentin (6); Straffälliger (7); Straffällige (8)Person, die rechtswidrig und schuldhaft einen gesetzlichen Tatbestand erfüllt hat.
PS: CH; USG: (7)(8) zu vermeiden
(1) Schweiz. Strafgesetzbuch, Art. 7 (SR 311.0): (2) BSG 321.1 G 150395, Art. 46 Abs. 1 Ziff. 1; (3) BFS/BJ,
Anstaltenkatalog, 1998, S. 11: (4) POMBE, Baechtold, 1995; (5) BFS, Rückfallraten, 1997, S. 21; (6)(DF)(USG)
T. Freytag, Universität Freiburg, Seminar für Strafrecht, 2001; (7)(8) BFS, Bewährungshiffe in der Schweiz, 2001,
S.4
auteur (1); auteure (2); auteur de l’lnfraction (3); auteure de l’lnfraction (4); auteur de l’acte (5); auteure de l’acte (6); auteur de l’acte punissabie (7); auteure de l’acte punissabie (8); deltnquant (9); delinquante (10); auteur dlrect (11); auteure directe (12); auteur materiel (13); auteure materielle (14); auteur immediat (15); auteure immediate (16)Personne qui accomplit personneilement, avec la consclence ou ia volonte extgees par la loi, les actes
materlels constitutlfs d’une infraction.
PS:CH
Code penal suisse, (1) art. 7, (3) art. 27 a\. 3, (5) art. 18 ai 3, (9) art. 42 eh. 1 (RS 311.0); (2)(6)(8) CHA BE,
SCTerm, 1997; (4)(12)(14)(16)(GRM) ACH; (7) RSB 321.1 L 150395, art. 235; (10) Cornu, Voc. juridique, 1990,
p. 248; (11)(13)(15) Graven, Infraction penaie punissabie, 1995, p. 282; (DF) d’apres source (10), p. 83 sous
“auteur”
autore (1); autrice (2); autore di un reato (3); autrice di un reato (4); autore di reato (5); autrice di reato (6); autore diretto (7); autrice diretta (8); agente (9); delinquente (10)
Persona che realizza I presupposti oggettivl e soggettivi 6\ un reato. PS: CH: GRM: (9M10)f./m.
(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8)(DF) aw. M. Hohl Tattarietti, 2001; Codice penaie svizzero, (9) art. 7 cpv. 3, (10) art. 42 n. 1 (RS 311.0)
offender (1); perpetrator (2)Person who commits a crimlnal act with the mens rea required by the law.
PS:CH
(1) Home Office, Digest 2, Criminal Justice System, 1993, p. 7; (2) Romain, Dict. Legat Terms, part 1, EN-DE, 1989;
(DF) adaptation ofFrench definition

On the subject of Swiss German, Jens Wiese at Blogwiese has just announced that he has reached the end of his topic. At the moment he is rehashing old topics. He says that he often gets queries and they are all words he has already discussed. He still writes a weekly column in a couple of Swiss newspapers.

(Thanks to the ubiquitous Urs Wolffers)

10 thoughts on “Swiss criminal law terminology / Terminologie des Schweizer Strafrechts

  1. Rounding those prices is familiar in Finland as well. Finland did not even issue coins of 1 and 2 euro cents, the shopping bill is rounded to closest 5 cents. 1 and 2 cents coins issued in other euro countries are legal currency but even if you would be able to pay for a shopping bill ending up to 8 cents, you would still have to pay those extra two cents.

  2. That’s interesting. The Germans are very fond of small change. I count mine up when I’m queuing in a shop, so I know whether I can help with the exact sum or not.

    By the way, thanking the bus driver when leaving a bus is often commented on as a British thing.

  3. I used to ride a local bus here a few years ago where they regularly changed the driver on road. There was one driver who always said good morning/afternoon/evening to the passengers as he entered the bus and took over. Until somebody took their cell phone to call the police and report a drunken driver. :-P

  4. Kate Fox, in Watching the English, says thanking the bus driver is really just to make the thanker feel good and behave as if the bus driver had done a favour. The thank you is usually muttered, without eye contact or smiles. (I noticed myself doing this when I was last in England, jumping off the bus and saying ‘thank you’, while realizing it would be inaudible to the driver).

  5. We thank the busdriver as we leave in the US also (at least, in New York we do).

    Alternatively, in the evening we might say good night to him/her.

    I think it’s the same case as ‘have a good day’. The rules of interpersonal relations demand that we say something, but we have nothing to say. Indeed, anything more personal would be considered intrusive.

    Gary

  6. The picture in your post is indeed a High Court judge wearing old-style winter robes for trying civil cases. High Court judges no longer wear such robes.

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